The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach

The next Open Group Conference will be held in Newport Beach California taking place January 28 through 31st. Looks to be a lot of great speakers. The conference theme is “Big Data – The Transformation We Need to Embrace Today” and will bring together leading minds in technology to discuss the challenges and solutions facing Enterprise Architecture around the growth of Big Data.

I will also be attending and speaking at the event. For all that would like to meet up over the networking event or for lunch I would love to catch up!

If you are interested in going, act quickly. The Open Group  early bird discount expires on January 4th. 

Register Here

 

For more infomration see the details below: 

In addition to tutorial sessions on TOGAF® and ArchiMate®, the conference offers roughly 60 sessions on a varied of topics including:

  • The ways that Cloud Computing is transforming the possibilities for collecting, storing, and processing big data.
  • How to contend with Big Data in your Enterprise?
  • How does Big Data enable your Business Architecture?
  • What does the Big Data revolution mean for the Enterprise Architect?
  • Real-time analysis of Big Data in the Cloud.
  • Security challenges in the world of outsourced data.
  • What is an architectural view of Security for the Cloud?

Plenary speakers include:

  • Christian Verstraete, Chief Technologist – Cloud Strategy, HP
  • Mary Ann Mezzapelle, Strategist – Security Services, HP
  • Michael Cavaretta, Ph.D, Technical Leader, Predictive Analytics / Data Mining Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company
  • Adrian Lane, Analyst and Chief Technical Officer, Securosis
  • David Potter, Chief Technical Officer, Promise Innovation Oy
  • Ron Schuldt, Senior Partner, UDEF-IT, LLC

 

Gartner Identifies the Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2013

Late last month Gartner published their annual Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2013. Based on the view that Gartner paints it looks to me as a evelotuionary year ahead rather than revelotionary. This is no way is a bad thing. It shows what revolutionary concepts from last year have made it and are continuing to be invested in.

Gartner analysis can be summerized into three core statements / trends:

  • It's clear that there is a shift of where computing happens, from your desk to your palm and fingers anywhere in the world (1) (2) (5)
  • Information is real-time, always on and universally connected (3) (7) (8)
  • Cloud architectures are the de facto standard for enterprises going forward (4) (6) (9) (10)

 

The top 10 strategic technology trends for 2013 include:

  1. Mobile Device Battles
  2. Mobile Applications and HTML 5
  3. Personal Cloud
  4. Enterprise App Stores
  5. The Internet of Things
  6. Hybrid IT and Cloud
  7. Strategic Big Data
  8. Actionable Analytics
  9. In Memory Computing
  10. Integrated Ecosystems

 

Mobile Device Battles

Gartner predicts that by 2013 mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common Web access device worldwide and that by 2015 over 80 percent of the handsets sold in mature markets will be smartphones. However, only 20 percent of those handsets are likely to be Windows phones. By 2015 media tablet shipments will reach around 50 percent of laptop shipments and Windows 8 will likely be in third place behind Google’s Android and Apple iOS operating systems. Windows 8 is Microsoft’s big bet and Windows 8 platform styles should be evaluated to get a better idea of how they might perform in real-world environments as well as how users will respond. Consumerization will mean enterprises won't be able to force users to give up their iPads or prevent the use of Windows 8 to the extent consumers adopt consumer targeted Windows 8 devices. Enterprises will need to support a greater variety of form factors reducing the ability to standardize PC and tablet hardware. The implications for IT is that the era of PC dominance with Windows as the single platform will be replaced with a post-PC era where Windows is just one of a variety of environments IT will need to support.

Mobile Applications and HTML5

The market for tools to create consumer and enterprise facing apps is complex with well over 100 potential tools vendors. Currently, Gartner separates mobile development tools into several categories. For the next few years, no single tool will be optimal for all types of mobile application so expect to employ several. Six mobile architectures – native, special, hybrid, HTML 5, Message and No Client will remain popular. However, there will be a long term shift away from native apps to Web apps as HTML5 becomes more capable. Nevertheless, native apps won't disappear, and will always offer the best user experiences and most sophisticated features. Developers will also need to develop new design skills to deliver touch-optimized mobile applications that operate across a range of devices in a coordinated fashion.

Personal Cloud

The personal cloud will gradually replace the PC as the location where individuals keep their personal content, access their services and personal preferences and center their digital lives. It will be the glue that connects the web of devices they choose to use during different aspects of their daily lives. The personal cloud will entail the unique collection of services, Web destinations and connectivity that will become the home of their computing and communication activities. Users will see it as a portable, always-available place where they go for all their digital needs. In this world no one platform, form factor, technology or vendor will dominate and managed diversity and mobile device management will be an imperative. The personal cloud shifts the focus from the client device to cloud-based services delivered across devices.

Enterprise App Stores

Enterprises face a complex app store future as some vendors will limit their stores to specific devices and types of apps forcing the enterprise to deal with multiple stores, multiple payment processes and multiple sets of licensing terms. By 2014, Gartner believes that many organizations will deliver mobile applications to workers through private application stores. With enterprise app stores the role of IT shifts from that of a centralized planner to a market manager providing governance and brokerage services to users and potentially an ecosystem to support apptrepreneurs.

The Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a concept that describes how the Internet will expand as physical items such as consumer devices and physical assets are connected to the Internet. Key elements of the IoT which are being embedded in a variety of mobile devices include embedded sensors, image recognition technologies and NFC payment. As a result, mobile no longer refers only to use of cellular handsets or tablets. Cellular technology is being embedded in many new types of devices including pharmaceutical containers and automobiles. Smartphones and other intelligent devices don't just use the cellular network, they communicate via NFC, Bluetooth, LE and Wi-Fi to a wide range of devices and peripherals, such as wristwatch displays, healthcare sensors, smart posters, and home entertainment systems. The IoT will enable a wide range of new applications and services while raising many new challenges.

Hybrid IT and Cloud Computing

As staffs have been asked to do more with less, IT departments must play multiple roles in coordinating IT-related activities, and cloud computing is now pushing that change to another level. A recently conducted Gartner IT services survey revealed that the internal cloud services brokerage (CSB) role is emerging as IT organizations realize that they have a responsibility to help improve the provisioning and consumption of inherently distributed, heterogeneous and often complex cloud services for their internal users and external business partners. The internal CSB role represents a means for the IT organization to retain and build influence inside its organization and to become a value center in the face of challenging new requirements relative to increasing adoption of cloud as an approach to IT consumption.

Strategic Big Data

Big Data is moving from a focus on individual projects to an influence on enterprises’ strategic information architecture. Dealing with data volume, variety, velocity and complexity is forcing changes to many traditional approaches. This realization is leading organizations to abandon the concept of a single enterprise data warehouse containing all information needed for decisions. Instead they are moving towards multiple systems, including content management, data warehouses, data marts and specialized file systems tied together with data services and metadata, which will become the "logical" enterprise data warehouse.

Actionable Analytics

Analytics is increasingly delivered to users at the point of action and in context. With the improvement of performance and costs, IT leaders can afford to perform analytics and simulation for every action taken in the business. The mobile client linked to cloud-based analytic engines and big data repositories potentially enables use of optimization and simulation everywhere and every time. This new step provides simulation, prediction, optimization and other analytics, to empower even more decision flexibility at the time and place of every business process action.

In Memory Computing

In memory computing (IMC) can also provide transformational opportunities. The execution of certain-types of hours-long batch processes can be squeezed into minutes or even seconds allowing these processes to be provided in the form of real-time or near real-time services that can be delivered to internal or external users in the form of cloud services. Millions of events can be scanned in a matter of a few tens of millisecond to detect correlations and patterns pointing at emerging opportunities and threats "as things happen." The possibility of concurrently running transactional and analytical applications against the same dataset opens unexplored possibilities for business innovation. Numerous vendors will deliver in-memory-based solutions over the next two years driving this approach into mainstream use.

Integrated Ecosystems

The market is undergoing a shift to more integrated systems and ecosystems and away from loosely coupled heterogeneous approaches. Driving this trend is the user desire for lower cost, simplicity, and more assured security. Driving the trend for vendors the ability to have more control of the solution stack and obtain greater margin in the sale as well as offer a complete solution stack in a controlled environment, but without the need to provide any actual hardware. The trend is manifested in three levels. Appliances combine hardware and software and software and services are packaged to address and infrastructure or application workload. Cloud-based marketplaces and brokerages facilitate purchase, consumption and/or use of capabilities from multiple vendors and may provide a foundation for ISV development and application runtime. In the mobile world, vendors including Apple, Google and Microsoft drive varying degrees of control across and end-to-end ecosystem extending the client through the apps.

 

 

Gartner Enterprise Architecture Tools Magic Quadrant 2012

Gartner has released yet another great resource for Enterprise Architects with their EA Tools Magic Quadrant.

The full report can be found here: http://www.gartner.com/technology/reprints.do?id=1-1CVXD3X&ct=121119&utm_content=c26292b9-8692-4afe-9fec-28e9315d6a34

 

Mike The Architect Blog: Gartner Enterprise Architecture Tools Magic Quadrant 2012

For those that have already selected an EA tool and are looking to find out how your vendor is fairing in the overall landscape, Gartner states it well in their What’s New section with what changes have occurred over the last year from the last study:

Overall, it’s been a "light" year as far as the degree of change in this marketplace is concerned. During the past year, some EA tool vendors have begun, or continue, to further reposition their products as broader enterprise business planning tools, in addition to being classical EA tools. This drives two primary vendor changes: in product marketing and in product output targeted at effective presentation to business leaders. This repositioning is helping vendors increase the interest and engagement of business leaders, and overcome skepticism about the term "enterprise architecture." These vendors report that they are working to expand their addressable market and increase revenue.
For users, this strengthens vendor viability by expanding their business in this otherwise smaller, niche market. At the same time, it drives improvement in features that are important for use by business stakeholders. Although these vendors still support EA concepts, principles and best practices, this repositioning may help to rebrand IT-centric architecture efforts in a more business-relevant manner.
Of course, renaming and repositioning EA will not resolve challenges of governance, business strategy, measurement, collaboration and communications. Clients need to evaluate a vendor based on its real abilities and capabilities to support their holistic EA tool needs — not based purely on market repositioning.

Enable Cloud Strategy and Planning with Predictable Methods, Models, and Tools

Mike The Architect Blog - Cloud Strategy and Planning

We previously
looked at why cloud is so important (Challenge
the Status Quo and Advance Business through Cloud Computing
, ),
approaches to cloud strategy (Understanding
Which Investments Should go to the Cloud
, Cloud
Strategy Begins with Value and Balances Risk
) and who the best
people (Why
Enterprise Architects Must Drive Cloud Strategy and Planning
) are to
execute. Today we’ll examine the methods, models, and tools that the enterprise
architect should use for effective cloud strategy and planning.

Methodologies
As far as methodologies go, it’s usually
better not to reinvent the wheel. There are already proven general frameworks EAs can use, so try to leverage
what is already out there whenever possible. When using an existing
general-purpose framework like TOGAF, apply cloud specifics to it.

Using a framework like TOGAF can ensure that you
are not missing the critical steps, questions and outcomes that every good
architecture should have. This will also ensure that all the other architecture
work and this work is consistent and predictable with the outcomes it produces.
Below are a list of a few benefits for leveraging TOGAF as your methodology for
Cloud Strategy and Planning:

  • Broad Community – If a custom framework is built, very few people
    have expertise and experience. TOGAF has an extremely broad EA acceptance,
    adoption and certification.
  • Deliverables and ArtifactsTOGAF comes
    with a wealth of “out of the box” templates
    that can be leveraged to
    architect.
  • Linkages to SOA and Cloud IP The Open Group which manages TOGAF, has
    other forums  and working groups that
    builds content for specific architecture areas and domains such as SOA,
    Cloud, Business Architecture and Security Architecture to name a few.
  • Associated Cloud Standards Bodies – The Open Group has done a great job of
    uniting multiple specialized and deep cloud standards bodies with the TOGAF
    standard to bring together the best of both worlds. The general purpose
    framework applied. These partners include NIST, Cloud Security Alliance and more.
    All this work has come together in The
    Open Group Cloud Computing Work Group
    .

Below is a visual on how Cloud Strategy and Planning
extends TOGAF within this framework:


Mike The Architect Blog - Cloud Strategy and Planning TOGAF Method.jpg

Another great visual is from Serge Thorn where he shows this from
a native TOGAF view:

Mike The Architect Blog - Cloud Strategy and Planning TOGAF Detail

Check out his blog post, “Cloud
Computing Requires Enterprise Architecture and TOGAF

Is TOGAF the only methodology you use? No. Just
like any other architecture work there are many different facets other than
just architecture such as: Risk Management, Information Security, Project /
Program Management, Software Development and Operations. There are methodologies
and frameworks for each specialized area that complement your architecture
work.

Some things to remember when adopting methodologies:

  • Strategy Methods are Universal – The same macro/basic steps are the same
    and can be applied to most anything. Just like with anything you will have to tailor
    slightly to your needs. DO NOT REINVENT
    PROVEN MODELS
    .
  • Make General Purpose Methods Specific – These were meant to be applied to a
    specific problem set. Cloud is
    no different.
  • Use Extensions – Cloud tools and techniques such as CSA, NIST,
    and Open Group-specific resources can be very useful in giving general-purpose
    frameworks meaning.

 

When we apply these
aspects to a cloud methodology you get The Cloud Strategy and Planning (CSP)
Framework. It is comprised of three simplified phases and seven activities.

 
Mike The Architect Blog - Cloud Strategy and Planning Method and Act

CSP
embraces and extends proven practices in the industry and the industry
resources from the following distinguished bodies:

  • The Open Group (TOGAF)
  • Cloud Security Alliance (CSA)
  • NIST Cloud Computing Working Groups
  • Sherwood Applied Business Security
    Architecture (SABSA)
  • Cloud Security Alliance (CSA)

 

Activity Descriptions

Below is a high-level overview of the activities with the description of
what occurs in each. The detailed steps are not shown below.

Strategy
Rationalization

1

Establish Scope, and Approach

  • Conduct the Cloud Envisioning Workshop
  • Provide overview of cloud computing
  • Define the enterprise business model for
    cloud computing
  • Establish project charter

 

2

Understand Strategic Vision

  • Gather the IT and business strategic
    objectives
  • Identify strategic cloud computing patterns
    and technologies
  • Analyze customer feasibility and readiness
  • State strategic vision for cloud computing

 

3

Identify and Prioritize Capabilities

  • Define evaluation criteria for key IT &
    business value drivers
  • Evaluate the capabilities based on these
    metrics
  • Identify ~5 high-priority capabilities for
    deeper analysis

 

 

Cloud Valuation

4

Profile
Capabilities

 

  • Determine current state of capability
    maturity leveraging IO Maturity Tools
  • Execute Risk Analysis Method with
    corresponding assessments and remediation steps.
  • Profile the capability asset portfolios of
    information, technology, and processes and analyze by architectural fit, risk
    and readiness

 

5

Recommend
Deployment Patterns

 

  • Research capability proven practices and
    market direction
  • Define target cloud capability requirements
  • Determine optimal cloud service and
    deployment patterns for the capabilities based on fit, value, and risk

 

 

 

Business
Transformation Planning

6

Define
and Prioritize Opportunities

 

  • Completely define opportunities to
    include  an overview, benefits, risks,
    assessment results, technology impacts, and project plan
  • Prioritize opportunities for detailed
    architecture and execution

 

7

Understand Strategic Vision

  • Assess implementation risks and dependencies
  • Develop and deliver a business
    transformation roadmap
  • Validate with the customer and edit
    accordingly

 

 

Models

With respect to models, there are many out there readily available. Since
we are starting with  business value we
want to make sure we continue to do so and ensure there is a bridge from
strategy to implementation.

Mike The Architect Blog - Top Down Strategy

Given the top down
nature you will want to pull from models  that lend to our approach. When selecting
models, take a step back and ensure you fully understand the scope of what you
want to accomplish then select the most appropriate models from the many
sources at your disposal such as: analysts, standards bodies, industry bodies
or internal reference models.

For example, CSP
integrates SABSA to ensure that CSP has a classification scheme to capture business
requirements along with the identification, classification and management of risk.
The SABSA method focuses on the area of security while CSP extends this for cloud
computing. CSP incorporates a similar structure to SABSA and utilized the SABSA
matrix as a stellar example of using question-based analysis in IT
decision-making. By using the business requirements as the “red thread” through
the analysis, SABSA and CSP are both able to ensure that the business
objectives are being met. In the case of CSP, the business should be the
driving force behind the cloud transformation.

Mike The Architect Blog - SABSA Matrix

A common issue I
see when selecting models are that a model is selected either based on
preference or it is good enough. Don’t do that. Make sure you have a fit for
purpose model. If you don’t you may not get an accurate output.

 

Below are a good
set of models that can be used when rationalizing strategy:

  • Strategy maps
  • Business canvas
  • Hosen strategy
  • Net Present Value (NPV)
  • Business Scenarios
  • SWOT
  • Porters Five Forces Analysis
  • Motivation Model

Mike The Architect Blog - Strategy Map Example

Tools

 Now let’s talk about
the tools. These will allow us to automate the method along with helping align,
measure, quantify and qualify our work.

The tools below
will help

  • Charter – Template to authorize the
    project and define scope, stakeholders and timeline
  • Enterprise Capability Assessment
    Enterprise level 1 capability analysis to segment a customer’s portfolio for
    the discovery of cloud opportunities.
  • Business Heat Map – Graphical view of an
    organization based on business capabilities and cloud attributes like risk,
    value, fit and readiness
  • Capability Prioritization – Further
    refinement of each business capability with respect to cloud risk, fit and
    readiness
  • Capability Profiling – Rollup dashboard
    of a given capability to determine the level of value and risk it provides in
    the context of cloud.
  • Cloud Pattern Valuation – Robust metric
    driven analysis tool used to determine which cloud service and deployment
    models should be used for a solution.
  • Cloud Pattern Matching – Graphical tool
    to connect service and deployment models with business or technical capabilities.
  • Portfolio Analysis – A tool to plot cloud
    opportunities to a grid based on Business Priority, Value, Risk and Effort to
    aid in the roadmapping.
  • Cloud Opportunity Dashboard  – A dashboard that provides a complete
    rollup of the Cloud Valuation assessments into one sheet to support decision
    making.
  • Cloud Taxonomy –This taxonomy provides a
    way of rationalizing cloud specific cloud implementation decisions.
  • Cloud Risk Framework – A risk reference
    model that identifies the key aspects of cloud risk to be assessed.
  • Cloud Risk Method – Process for applying
    a risk classification to a potential cloud solution.
  • CSP Project Planning – Examples of a
    defined project engagement, with timelines, milestones, activities and
    deliverables.

A good example of a tool leveraged in CSP is The Capability Planning
Tool. It analyses Business and IT capabilities under seven areas that fall
under four assessment drivers: architectural fit, value, risk, and readiness:

  • Architectural
    Fit
    : Adoption and Complexity
  • Value:
    Cost and Strategic Alignment
  • Risk:
    Significance and Regulations, Standards, and Policies
  • Readiness:
    Organizational Readiness and Technical Readiness

For all capabilities, the EA will ask the customer for the enterprise’s
score in each topic area. For example, for the business capability, Claims
Management, the EA will ask for the capability’s level of adoption based on the
following criteria: 5-Enterprise-Proven, 4-Tested, 3-Industry-Proven,
2-Emerging, and 1-Not Available.

This assessment is intended to capture a range from 1 to 5 for each
topic area under these assessment drivers. The end result is a rolled-up
dashboard with the scores of architectural fit, value, risk, readiness, and an
overall score for each capability. The final results presented in the dashboard
will allow the EA to determine the high-priority capabilities with the
customer.

Mike The Architect Blog - Capability Planning Tool Worksheet
Mike The Architect Blog - Capability Planning Tool Dashboard

Conclusion

The Cloud Strategy & Planning (CSP)
guidance helps establish a common context for cloud computing among all
business and IT stakeholders. Furthermore, it allows companies to define an
actionable cloud opportunity plan for qualified & validated cloud
opportunities to be architected for a specific service and deployment model.

The CSP guidance has 3 phases and 7
activities which give an overall structure to the approach. These allow the
client to assess and identify the current maturity level of their competences,
to find out which of these are best suited for cloud migration, and to evaluate
and better understand the opportunities for cloud solutions in the
organization. This assessment will ultimately lead to a business transformation
roadmap that is aligned with the enterprise’s technology and business
objectives. 

A few key points:

  • Focus on Maximizing Business Value – Leverage a business top down
    process of analysis and refinement, describing business capabilities to matched cloud technologies is essential
  • Capability
    Driven
    – Respect both the business and IT dimensions of an organization
  • Balance
    Value and Risk
     – Identify cloud
    opportunities while also rationalizing the potential challenges
  • Leverage Industry Best Practices – Amplify value of proven methods, models
    and tools to reduce risk of a poorly planned and executed strategy.

Related articles

Technology Architecture Questions for Vendors
Challenge the Status Quo and Advance Business through Cloud Computing
TOGAF Templates

IASA World Summit 2012 Conference

Mike The Architect Blog - IASA_World_Summit LogoI wanted to let my readers know that I will be attending and preseting at the The Iasa World Summit taking place December 6th
– 7th in Austin, TX. For those that are going or thinking of going and would like to meet up I will be attedning all of the sessions and events so please feel free to grab me to chat.

The event provides an opportunity for architect
practitioners and business leaders to share the skills and best practices that
drive growth and value for today’s enterprise.

Join your fellow practitioners for a series of interactive
courses and presentations featuring the most current learning, proven practices
and futures in architecture:

  • Industry Case Studies & Best Practices
  • Woman in IT
  • Software Architecture
  • Enterprise Architecture
  • Business Architecture
  • Infomration Architecture

All of my readers are invited to attend the summit at a 25%
discount through the following link: http://bit.ly/TC7gxF
.