Integrating TOGAF and The Banking Industry Architecture Network (BIAN) Service Landscape Whitepaper

Today The Open Group released the updated whitepaper, Integrating the TOGAF® Standard with the BIAN Service Landscape. This release might be beneficial for those architects in the banking space that use or considering to use TOGAF in conjunction with BIAN.

For those not familiar with BIAN, it is a not-for-profit organization which seeks to accelerate the adoption of Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) in the banking industry. It does so by promoting convergence
towards a common service landscape, and by providing semantic standards which makes it
easier and more cost-effective to integrate such services.

Mike The Architect Blog: TOGAF and BIAN Whitepaper

This whitepaper aims to support Enterprise Architects within the banking industry, reaping the synergies of two complementary industry frameworks:

  • TOGAF®, an Open Group Standard, is a proven Enterprise Architecture methodology and framework used by leading global organizations to improve business efficiency.
  • BIAN, the Banking Industry Architecture Network, delivers an overall framework and set of IT Service definitions and BIAN Business Scenarios specific to the banking industry, aimed at improving systems interoperability.

In the heart of the White Paper, both the TOGAF standard and BIAN are mapped to each other. The leverage of the BIAN deliverables in the context of the TOGAF Architecture Development Method (ADM) is further elaborated. For each step in an architecture development process, the integration of BIAN deliverables is described.

 

For more information

Open Group Enterprise Architecture Conference London 2013 Highlights

image

Last week , The Open Group kicked off their signature Enterprise Architecture Conference in London. Like others in the  recent past the Open Group has taken on a industry focus for these quarterly conferences. The goal here is to provide a very tailored experience to EA’s in those specific industries. With this focus and where the conference was hosted I was surprised to see the very broad attendance and representation from many nations all over the world that include 28 nations: UK, US, Columbia, Philippines, Australia, Japan, Netherlands, Germany, South Africa and many others.

The theme of this conference was Business Transformation in Finance, Government and Healthcare. There were some very interesting sessions specifically from the keynote presenters based in the UK. If you were not there you can watch the live stream of the keynote presentations here:

You will find from all of these presentations that there is a shift in how EA is used and the results generated. As an example, Judith Jones from Architecting-The-Enterprise, shared her findings from the World Economic Forum, posing the question “what keeps 1000 global leaders awake at night”? There were stats were presented with over 50 global risks – economical, societal, environmental, geopolitical and technological. There wasn’t the typical drudging over IT oriented topics. Luckily this was a shared theme across many of the pure vertical tracks.

The Open Group has posted two summaries are well, I would suggest taking a look at them. I wasn’t going to duplicate much of what they covered since they did such a good job. See below:

 

Announcements

Even though there was a vertical focus the Open Group did cover additional areas around the profession of EA, forward looking views on the industry and architecture topics like big data and cloud.

Included in that were a series of announcements:

 

Mike Walker’s Participation at the Event

Unfortunately for myself I wasn’t able to attend many of the afternoon sessions at the conference. Would see more coverage and thoughts about the event. This was due largely to my leadership duties at the Open Group in developing the next version of TOGAF.  Specifically I spent time in two areas, leading the Business Architecture work stream along with Enterprise Architecture Capabilities workshop (see more here). I will talk more about the Enterprise Architecture Capabilities in another post.

The time that I did spend in the conference center was spent presenting to the conference attendees. I had two sessions that centered around the profession itself:

  • Enterprise Architecture Certifications Distilled
  • Panel Session: Looking to the Future

 

Enterprise Architecture Certifications Distilled

In my presentation, I distilled a wide range of the certifications directly applicable to Enterprise Architecture. While this was a narrow view on the EA profession, it’s one of the most common questions I get from customers.  Certifications are only one component of a career planning conversation. Most importantly for organizations, it is a component of a competency driven strategy to drive results for your organization.

With that said, and if you agree with the assertion, there are so many different EA certifications out there, without the proper framing it can get a bit confusing. I provide perspectives on certifications like TOGAF®, Open CA, and Open CITS  to name a few. Then discuss why it is important to choose the right certification for your career. I examine why skills and experience-based certifications are becoming increasingly more important to both employers and employees as part of the professional development process.

You can see the Live Stream below for those that wasn’t able to attend:

http://new.livestream.com/accounts/527997/events/2471419/videos/33535824/player?autoPlay=false&height=360&mute=false&width=640

 

 

Looking into the Future Panel

image

Thanks to David Daniel@AgileEngineer for snapping a shot of all of us.

In this panel session I participated we discussed some of the key issues facing the future development of the Enterprise Architecture discipline. You might of seen me talk on other panels about this very topic. A detailed post on my predictions can be found in the post entitled, “Predictions: Enterprise Architecture In 2020”. My thoughts on these topics haven’t changed much.

The questions asked were:

  1. How will the practice of architecture be materially different in 5 years?
  2. Will enterprise architecture ever achieve a professional status – similar to medicine or law?
  3. Are universities the right place to teach enterprise architecture?
  4. Are there any other disciplines that threaten to supersede EA? If so – what are they?

http://new.livestream.com/accounts/527997/events/2471386/videos/32970934/player?autoPlay=false&height=360&mute=false&width=640

 

 

 

Thank You

I wanted to extend a big thank you to both The Open Group for asking me to come and speak again at their conference along with all the attendees that joined my sessions, asked some really great questions and tweeted some of my thoughts.

Thank you!

A Different Open Group Enterprise Architecture Conference in 2013

Mike The Architect Blog: A Different Open Group Enterprise Architecture Conference in 2013

This year the Open Group is doing something very different with their conference from previous years, they are verticalizing. Smart move. With all the talk about business centric Enterprise Architecture this is a smart direction on the Open Group’s part. This get’s us one step past just “talking about the business” generally without any application but to the heart of each set of concerns that businesses have.

The conference will be held in Philadelphia on July 15-17, 2013 with Member Meetings  set post conference on July 18, 2013. If this conference of interest the early bird registration ends May 31, 2013.  To register go here. In line with the conference The Open Group is also giving delegates at our conference in Philadelphia the opportunity to combine the three day conference with some additional training events on Thursday 18 July and Friday 19 July called Professional Days. Looks to be some good deals from partners on training on the following topic areas:

About the Event

The first two days of the summit will focus on Enterprise Transformation issues concerning three core vertical industry sectors: Finance and Commerce, Government & Defense, and Healthcare. Day three will offer more detailed workshops and tutorials on business, professional development and technically focused topics.

Below are the additional topics areas:

Open CA Gets Top Pay in Enterprise Architecture Certifications

As I was doing some market research for my EA’s competency driven strategy I ran across an interesting article from late 2012 that validates the importance of a well educated, fully rounded and even certified Enterprise Architect. The article, “23 IT Certifications That Mean Higher Pay” posted on CIO.com in September of 2012, shows that companies value these skills and are willing to pay more. 

The data was pulled from the Foote Research Group quarterly 2012 IT Skills Demand and Pay Trends Report and its CEO David Foote spoke with CIO.com about how you can use certifications to get employers to show you the money.

The article separates the list into three tiers of percent added to base pay from the lowest to highest:

  • 8% – 13% Added to Base
  • 10% – 15% Added to Base
  • 12% – 16% Added to Base

 

In the highest tier of 12% to 16% Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA) gets top ranking in Enterprise Architecture certifications for largest percent premium added to your base salary. I received my Open CA certification in 2011 and was nominated to the certification board. It was quite the honor for both.

Afterwards I really wanted top share my experiences and write up a condensed version of what Open CA really was. You can find this information in the post entitled, “The Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA) Program Distilled“.  

Two things I think this article says about our industry:

  1. Baseline of Skills and Competencies – Whether it is Open CA or any other EA certification, I believe this shows a natural maturing in the EA discipline. The industry is bringing together a set of common and recognized set of skills and competencies through these certifications. In this case the EA market has recoginized Open CA as the most popular and perhaps the defacto standard for EA skills and competencies. 
  2. Competencies of Skills – I liked seeing Open CA certification on this list rather than TOGAF or a Zachman certification (there are many others besides these two). The reason I prefer Open CA is because it is  competency based. Meaning it’s about how and what you have done as a practitioner and not about what you know from reading a book or taking a class.  

 

For more information on Open CA: http://www.opengroup.org/openca/cert/ 

 

Also of note in that tier with Open CA is the Program Management Professional (PgMP) certification.

Open Group 2013 Predictions Part 2

Continuing on from the Open Group 2013 Predictions Part 1 the Open group continues to explore additional aspects of Enterprise Architecture and related areas.

In this Part 2 of the series the predictions are broken up in major areas:

  1. Global Enterprise Architecture
  2. Business Architecture
  3. Trusted Technology

 

Global Enterprise Architecture

 By Chris Forde, Vice President of Enterprise Architecture and Membership Capabilities

 Cloud is no longer a bleeding edge technology – most organizations are already well on their way to deploying cloud technology.  However, Cloud implementations are resurrecting a perennial problem for organizations—integration. Now that Cloud infrastructures are being deployed, organizations are having trouble integrating different systems, especially with systems hosted by third parties outside their organization. What will happen when two, three or four technical delivery systems are hosted on AND off premise? This presents a looming integration problem.

 As we see more and more organizations buying into cloud infrastructures, we’ll see an increase in cross-platform integration architectures globally in 2013. The role of the enterprise architect will become more complex. Architectures must not only ensure that systems are integrated properly, but architects also need to figure out a way to integrate outsourced teams and services and determine responsibility across all systems. Additionally, outsourcing and integration will lead to increased focus on security in the coming year, especially in healthcare and financial sectors. When so many people are involved, and responsibility is shared or lost in the process, gaping holes can be left unnoticed. As data is increasingly shared between organizations and current trends escalate, security will also become more and more of a concern. Integration may yield great rewards architecturally, but it also means greater exposure to vulnerabilities outside of your firewall.

 Within the Architecture Forum, we will be working on improvements to TOGAF® throughout 2013, as well as an effort to continue to harmonize TOGAF and ArchiMate®.  The Forum also expects to publish a whitepaper on application portfolio management in the new year, as well as be involved in the upcoming Cloud Reference Architecture.

 In China, The Open Group is progressing well. In 2013, we’ll continue translating The Open Group website, books and whitepapers from English to Chinese. Partnerships and Open CA certification will remain in the forefront of global priorities, as well as enrolling TOGAF trainers throughout Asia Pacific as Open Group members. There are a lot of exciting developments arising, and we will keep you updated as we expand our footprint in China and the rest of Asia.

 

Business Architecture

By Steve Philp, Marketing Director for Open CA and Open CITS

Business Architecture is still a relatively new discipline, but in 2013 I think it will continue to grow in prominence and visibility from an executive perspective. C-Level decision makers are not just looking at operational efficiency initiatives and cost reduction programs to grow their future revenue streams; they are also looking at market strategy and opportunity analysis.

Business Architects are extremely valuable to an organization when they understand market and technology trends in a particular sector. They can then work with business leaders to develop strategies based on the capabilities and positioning of the company to increase revenue, enhance their market position and improve customer loyalty.

Senior management recognizes that technology also plays a crucial role in how organizations can achieve their business goals. A major role of the Business Architect is to help merge technology with business processes to help facilitate this business transformation.

There are a number of key technology areas for 2013 where Business Architects will be called upon to engage with the business such as Cloud Computing, Big Data and social networking. Therefore, the need to have competent Business Architects is a high priority in both the developed and emerging markets and the demand for Business Architects currently exceeds the supply. There are some training and certification programs available based on a body of knowledge, but how do you establish who is a practicing Business Architect if you are looking to recruit?

The Open Group is trying to address this issue and has incorporated a Business Architecture stream into The Open Group Certified Architect (Open CA) program. There has already been significant interest in this stream from both organizations and practitioners alike. This is because Open CA is a skills- and experience-based program that recognizes, at different levels, those individuals who are actually performing in a Business Architecture role. You must complete a candidate application package and be interviewed by your peers. Achieving certification demonstrates your competency as a Business Architect and therefore will stand you in good stead for both next year and beyond.

You can view the conformance criteria for the Open CA Business Architecture stream at https://www2.opengroup.org/ogsys/catalog/X120.

 

Trusted Technology

By Sally Long, Director of Consortia Services

The interdependency of all countries on global technology providers and technology providers’ dependencies on component suppliers around the world is more certain than ever before.  The need to work together in a vendor-neutral, country-neutral environment to assure there are standards for securing technology development and supply chain operations will become increasingly apparent in 2013. Securing the global supply chain can not be done in a vacuum, by a few providers or a few governments, it must be achieved by working together with all governments, providers, component suppliers and integrators and it must be done through open standards and accreditation programs that demonstrate conformance to those standards and are available to everyone.

The Open Group’s Trusted Technology Forum is providing that open, vendor and country-neutral environment, where suppliers from all countries and governments from around the world can work together in a trusted collaborative environment, to create a standard and an accreditation program for securing the global supply chain. The Open Trusted Technology Provider Standard (O-TTPS) Snapshot (Draft) was published in March of 2012 and is the basis for our 2013 predictions.

We predict that in 2013:

  • Version 1.0 of the O-TTPS (Standard) will be published.
  • Version 1.0 will be submitted to the ISO PAS process in 2013, and will likely become part of the ISO/IEC 27036 standard, where Part 5 of that ISO standard is already reserved for the O-TTPS work
  • An O-TTPS Accreditation Program – open to all providers, component suppliers, and integrators, will be launched
  • The Forum will continue the trend of increased member participation from governments and suppliers around the world
  • Continuing on the theme of predictions, here are a few more, which focus on global IT trends, business architecture, OTTF and Open Group events in 2013.

The Open Group Conference in Newport Beach

The next Open Group Conference will be held in Newport Beach California taking place January 28 through 31st. Looks to be a lot of great speakers. The conference theme is “Big Data – The Transformation We Need to Embrace Today” and will bring together leading minds in technology to discuss the challenges and solutions facing Enterprise Architecture around the growth of Big Data.

I will also be attending and speaking at the event. For all that would like to meet up over the networking event or for lunch I would love to catch up!

If you are interested in going, act quickly. The Open Group  early bird discount expires on January 4th. 

Register Here

 

For more infomration see the details below: 

In addition to tutorial sessions on TOGAF® and ArchiMate®, the conference offers roughly 60 sessions on a varied of topics including:

  • The ways that Cloud Computing is transforming the possibilities for collecting, storing, and processing big data.
  • How to contend with Big Data in your Enterprise?
  • How does Big Data enable your Business Architecture?
  • What does the Big Data revolution mean for the Enterprise Architect?
  • Real-time analysis of Big Data in the Cloud.
  • Security challenges in the world of outsourced data.
  • What is an architectural view of Security for the Cloud?

Plenary speakers include:

  • Christian Verstraete, Chief Technologist – Cloud Strategy, HP
  • Mary Ann Mezzapelle, Strategist – Security Services, HP
  • Michael Cavaretta, Ph.D, Technical Leader, Predictive Analytics / Data Mining Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company
  • Adrian Lane, Analyst and Chief Technical Officer, Securosis
  • David Potter, Chief Technical Officer, Promise Innovation Oy
  • Ron Schuldt, Senior Partner, UDEF-IT, LLC

 

Enable Cloud Strategy and Planning with Predictable Methods, Models, and Tools

Mike The Architect Blog - Cloud Strategy and Planning

We previously
looked at why cloud is so important (Challenge
the Status Quo and Advance Business through Cloud Computing
, ),
approaches to cloud strategy (Understanding
Which Investments Should go to the Cloud
, Cloud
Strategy Begins with Value and Balances Risk
) and who the best
people (Why
Enterprise Architects Must Drive Cloud Strategy and Planning
) are to
execute. Today we’ll examine the methods, models, and tools that the enterprise
architect should use for effective cloud strategy and planning.

Methodologies
As far as methodologies go, it’s usually
better not to reinvent the wheel. There are already proven general frameworks EAs can use, so try to leverage
what is already out there whenever possible. When using an existing
general-purpose framework like TOGAF, apply cloud specifics to it.

Using a framework like TOGAF can ensure that you
are not missing the critical steps, questions and outcomes that every good
architecture should have. This will also ensure that all the other architecture
work and this work is consistent and predictable with the outcomes it produces.
Below are a list of a few benefits for leveraging TOGAF as your methodology for
Cloud Strategy and Planning:

  • Broad Community – If a custom framework is built, very few people
    have expertise and experience. TOGAF has an extremely broad EA acceptance,
    adoption and certification.
  • Deliverables and ArtifactsTOGAF comes
    with a wealth of “out of the box” templates
    that can be leveraged to
    architect.
  • Linkages to SOA and Cloud IP The Open Group which manages TOGAF, has
    other forums  and working groups that
    builds content for specific architecture areas and domains such as SOA,
    Cloud, Business Architecture and Security Architecture to name a few.
  • Associated Cloud Standards Bodies – The Open Group has done a great job of
    uniting multiple specialized and deep cloud standards bodies with the TOGAF
    standard to bring together the best of both worlds. The general purpose
    framework applied. These partners include NIST, Cloud Security Alliance and more.
    All this work has come together in The
    Open Group Cloud Computing Work Group
    .

Below is a visual on how Cloud Strategy and Planning
extends TOGAF within this framework:


Mike The Architect Blog - Cloud Strategy and Planning TOGAF Method.jpg

Another great visual is from Serge Thorn where he shows this from
a native TOGAF view:

Mike The Architect Blog - Cloud Strategy and Planning TOGAF Detail

Check out his blog post, “Cloud
Computing Requires Enterprise Architecture and TOGAF

Is TOGAF the only methodology you use? No. Just
like any other architecture work there are many different facets other than
just architecture such as: Risk Management, Information Security, Project /
Program Management, Software Development and Operations. There are methodologies
and frameworks for each specialized area that complement your architecture
work.

Some things to remember when adopting methodologies:

  • Strategy Methods are Universal – The same macro/basic steps are the same
    and can be applied to most anything. Just like with anything you will have to tailor
    slightly to your needs. DO NOT REINVENT
    PROVEN MODELS
    .
  • Make General Purpose Methods Specific – These were meant to be applied to a
    specific problem set. Cloud is
    no different.
  • Use Extensions – Cloud tools and techniques such as CSA, NIST,
    and Open Group-specific resources can be very useful in giving general-purpose
    frameworks meaning.

 

When we apply these
aspects to a cloud methodology you get The Cloud Strategy and Planning (CSP)
Framework. It is comprised of three simplified phases and seven activities.

 
Mike The Architect Blog - Cloud Strategy and Planning Method and Act

CSP
embraces and extends proven practices in the industry and the industry
resources from the following distinguished bodies:

  • The Open Group (TOGAF)
  • Cloud Security Alliance (CSA)
  • NIST Cloud Computing Working Groups
  • Sherwood Applied Business Security
    Architecture (SABSA)
  • Cloud Security Alliance (CSA)

 

Activity Descriptions

Below is a high-level overview of the activities with the description of
what occurs in each. The detailed steps are not shown below.

Strategy
Rationalization

1

Establish Scope, and Approach

  • Conduct the Cloud Envisioning Workshop
  • Provide overview of cloud computing
  • Define the enterprise business model for
    cloud computing
  • Establish project charter

 

2

Understand Strategic Vision

  • Gather the IT and business strategic
    objectives
  • Identify strategic cloud computing patterns
    and technologies
  • Analyze customer feasibility and readiness
  • State strategic vision for cloud computing

 

3

Identify and Prioritize Capabilities

  • Define evaluation criteria for key IT &
    business value drivers
  • Evaluate the capabilities based on these
    metrics
  • Identify ~5 high-priority capabilities for
    deeper analysis

 

 

Cloud Valuation

4

Profile
Capabilities

 

  • Determine current state of capability
    maturity leveraging IO Maturity Tools
  • Execute Risk Analysis Method with
    corresponding assessments and remediation steps.
  • Profile the capability asset portfolios of
    information, technology, and processes and analyze by architectural fit, risk
    and readiness

 

5

Recommend
Deployment Patterns

 

  • Research capability proven practices and
    market direction
  • Define target cloud capability requirements
  • Determine optimal cloud service and
    deployment patterns for the capabilities based on fit, value, and risk

 

 

 

Business
Transformation Planning

6

Define
and Prioritize Opportunities

 

  • Completely define opportunities to
    include  an overview, benefits, risks,
    assessment results, technology impacts, and project plan
  • Prioritize opportunities for detailed
    architecture and execution

 

7

Understand Strategic Vision

  • Assess implementation risks and dependencies
  • Develop and deliver a business
    transformation roadmap
  • Validate with the customer and edit
    accordingly

 

 

Models

With respect to models, there are many out there readily available. Since
we are starting with  business value we
want to make sure we continue to do so and ensure there is a bridge from
strategy to implementation.

Mike The Architect Blog - Top Down Strategy

Given the top down
nature you will want to pull from models  that lend to our approach. When selecting
models, take a step back and ensure you fully understand the scope of what you
want to accomplish then select the most appropriate models from the many
sources at your disposal such as: analysts, standards bodies, industry bodies
or internal reference models.

For example, CSP
integrates SABSA to ensure that CSP has a classification scheme to capture business
requirements along with the identification, classification and management of risk.
The SABSA method focuses on the area of security while CSP extends this for cloud
computing. CSP incorporates a similar structure to SABSA and utilized the SABSA
matrix as a stellar example of using question-based analysis in IT
decision-making. By using the business requirements as the “red thread” through
the analysis, SABSA and CSP are both able to ensure that the business
objectives are being met. In the case of CSP, the business should be the
driving force behind the cloud transformation.

Mike The Architect Blog - SABSA Matrix

A common issue I
see when selecting models are that a model is selected either based on
preference or it is good enough. Don’t do that. Make sure you have a fit for
purpose model. If you don’t you may not get an accurate output.

 

Below are a good
set of models that can be used when rationalizing strategy:

  • Strategy maps
  • Business canvas
  • Hosen strategy
  • Net Present Value (NPV)
  • Business Scenarios
  • SWOT
  • Porters Five Forces Analysis
  • Motivation Model

Mike The Architect Blog - Strategy Map Example

Tools

 Now let’s talk about
the tools. These will allow us to automate the method along with helping align,
measure, quantify and qualify our work.

The tools below
will help

  • Charter – Template to authorize the
    project and define scope, stakeholders and timeline
  • Enterprise Capability Assessment
    Enterprise level 1 capability analysis to segment a customer’s portfolio for
    the discovery of cloud opportunities.
  • Business Heat Map – Graphical view of an
    organization based on business capabilities and cloud attributes like risk,
    value, fit and readiness
  • Capability Prioritization – Further
    refinement of each business capability with respect to cloud risk, fit and
    readiness
  • Capability Profiling – Rollup dashboard
    of a given capability to determine the level of value and risk it provides in
    the context of cloud.
  • Cloud Pattern Valuation – Robust metric
    driven analysis tool used to determine which cloud service and deployment
    models should be used for a solution.
  • Cloud Pattern Matching – Graphical tool
    to connect service and deployment models with business or technical capabilities.
  • Portfolio Analysis – A tool to plot cloud
    opportunities to a grid based on Business Priority, Value, Risk and Effort to
    aid in the roadmapping.
  • Cloud Opportunity Dashboard  – A dashboard that provides a complete
    rollup of the Cloud Valuation assessments into one sheet to support decision
    making.
  • Cloud Taxonomy –This taxonomy provides a
    way of rationalizing cloud specific cloud implementation decisions.
  • Cloud Risk Framework – A risk reference
    model that identifies the key aspects of cloud risk to be assessed.
  • Cloud Risk Method – Process for applying
    a risk classification to a potential cloud solution.
  • CSP Project Planning – Examples of a
    defined project engagement, with timelines, milestones, activities and
    deliverables.

A good example of a tool leveraged in CSP is The Capability Planning
Tool. It analyses Business and IT capabilities under seven areas that fall
under four assessment drivers: architectural fit, value, risk, and readiness:

  • Architectural
    Fit
    : Adoption and Complexity
  • Value:
    Cost and Strategic Alignment
  • Risk:
    Significance and Regulations, Standards, and Policies
  • Readiness:
    Organizational Readiness and Technical Readiness

For all capabilities, the EA will ask the customer for the enterprise’s
score in each topic area. For example, for the business capability, Claims
Management, the EA will ask for the capability’s level of adoption based on the
following criteria: 5-Enterprise-Proven, 4-Tested, 3-Industry-Proven,
2-Emerging, and 1-Not Available.

This assessment is intended to capture a range from 1 to 5 for each
topic area under these assessment drivers. The end result is a rolled-up
dashboard with the scores of architectural fit, value, risk, readiness, and an
overall score for each capability. The final results presented in the dashboard
will allow the EA to determine the high-priority capabilities with the
customer.

Mike The Architect Blog - Capability Planning Tool Worksheet
Mike The Architect Blog - Capability Planning Tool Dashboard

Conclusion

The Cloud Strategy & Planning (CSP)
guidance helps establish a common context for cloud computing among all
business and IT stakeholders. Furthermore, it allows companies to define an
actionable cloud opportunity plan for qualified & validated cloud
opportunities to be architected for a specific service and deployment model.

The CSP guidance has 3 phases and 7
activities which give an overall structure to the approach. These allow the
client to assess and identify the current maturity level of their competences,
to find out which of these are best suited for cloud migration, and to evaluate
and better understand the opportunities for cloud solutions in the
organization. This assessment will ultimately lead to a business transformation
roadmap that is aligned with the enterprise’s technology and business
objectives. 

A few key points:

  • Focus on Maximizing Business Value – Leverage a business top down
    process of analysis and refinement, describing business capabilities to matched cloud technologies is essential
  • Capability
    Driven
    – Respect both the business and IT dimensions of an organization
  • Balance
    Value and Risk
     – Identify cloud
    opportunities while also rationalizing the potential challenges
  • Leverage Industry Best Practices – Amplify value of proven methods, models
    and tools to reduce risk of a poorly planned and executed strategy.

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Challenge the Status Quo and Advance Business through Cloud Computing
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